Spotlight

Members in tech

Jul 31, 2020

Chartered Accountants share their stories about working at the nexus of technological change.

It is often said that Chartered Accountants can be found in every sector, and they are increasingly making their presence felt in the technology space. While some are supporting excellence in financial reporting, others are creating inclusive company cultures and driving new business.

In the pages that follow, three Chartered Accountants tell their stories about working at the nexus of technological change. Slack’s Lorna Mac Namara, Stripe’s Joe Kinvi and Hubspot’s Eimear Marrinan are all immersed in various strands of Ireland’s technology scene and have interesting insights to share.

Whether you are interested in a career in technology, working in the space already, or simply curious about the people behind the companies driving technological change, the interviews that follow will introduce you to influential Chartered Accountants in some of the world’s best-known organisations.

The professional slacker

Lorna Mac Namara discusses her role as Senior International Accountant at the online messaging platform, Slack.

Why did you choose a career in the tech sector?

I was looking for a challenge. I qualified in the middle of our last recession and about six months into a permanent, safe job, I saw an advertisement for a contract role with a tech company that would potentially go public. That company turned out to be Workday, and I was lucky to have been there pre- and post-IPO for five years. This was the greatest learning curve for me professionally and from there, I was hooked!

Describe your typical day.

I wake up at 5.30am. I am a mother of three small children under six, so there isn’t usually an option! I start my work day by catching up on Slack, our own product, which is a channel-based messaging platform. I get to see what decisions were made overnight, see discussions that were had, and progress made on projects and operational activities. I catch up with the international team here in Dublin and what they were working on also. From our Dublin office, we look after all countries outside North America and Canada. As a team, we cover time zones at either side of our day, so flexible working is essential. Most of my work, outside of the day-to-day routine, involves collaborating with colleagues around the world, both internally and externally. I work on cross-functional process improvement projects and international expansion plans.

What do you most enjoy about your role?

In a fast-growing company, there is a huge opportunity to make a difference and have an impact at every level. I love being part of building a finance function from the bottom up and seeing the company evolve from the start-up phase into a large public company. There is a real focus on finance transformation and continuous improvement here too. Once you have something solved, automated or improved, the company is growing so quickly that a new challenge presents itself. My roles have always evolved and they are diverse, which I love.

What surprised or challenged you when you first joined the tech sector?

What surprised me most was the energy people have for making our lives simpler, better and more productive. There is an openness to change and an appetite for trying things in new ways.

What has been your most important lesson to date?

To fully utilise my skills and continuously develop them. I focus on learning in every role and invest in CPD and continuous education as well as ‘on the job’ experience. I have managed payroll, tax, audit and month-end, and having to learn about other areas has benefited me – mostly in my finance transformation work. Also, never be precious about what task you are given at the start because you will get to learn about the company from the ground up. When it comes to career paths, sometimes a sideways move can be more beneficial than the traditional climb to a management role. And crucially, enjoy the people you work with. I am so lucky to have wonderful colleagues; they are the best sounding board during difficult times and late hours.

How do you think your particular role will change in the next ten years?

I believe the focus will be on adding value to the company and making accounting a strategic advantage along with the day-to-day operational work. I think global collaboration will be a critical factor in our future, particularly with how COVID-19 has affected work practices. Working in tech gives you an insight into how future accounting practices will evolve. I love working in a company like Slack, which is on the cutting edge of how our industry will operate and collaborate over the next decade – particularly when it comes to transparency and remote working.

Earning his stripes

Joe Kinvi, Growth Account Manager at Stripe, shares his experience of stepping into an area of the tech world that is growing at break-neck speed.

Why did you choose a career in the tech sector?

I started my career in the financial services sector and early on, I could see the impact tech was having on the industry. I was very attracted to how tech could enable me to do my job and around the same time, fintech was bubbling up in Europe. I knew this would be a massive industry soon and when the opportunity presented itself to work for a fintech start-up, I jumped on it. Fast-forward five years, fintech is here to stay and we are using more fintech products around the world than ever before. I really enjoy working with these fintech companies on a day-to-day basis.

Describe your typical day.

Unfortunately, a typical day doesn’t exist in the account manager world. But since COVID-19 hit, I’ve tried to structure my week in a way that allows me to handle customer calls early in the week and focus on getting things done during the latter half of the week. The typical Friday involves a retrospective review of my week and discussing various topics with the team. My entire team is based in Dublin, but I have some clients in the US and Canada so I work late the odd night – but that’s very rare. As I’ve been working from home, I get a lot more done because I’ve embraced, and gotten used to, this new way of working. (Pro-tip: get yourself a top-notch chair!)

What do you most enjoy about your role?

My role is very user-centric and I enjoy interacting with a mix of customer profiles, mostly within the financial services industry. My days are never the same and I spend a considerable amount of time interacting with engineers, product managers, project managers and biz-ops teams. Internally, I liaise with the sales and the engineering team. I really enjoy being the go-to person whenever my clients need something, and I use that as an opportunity to learn about the products we offer at an in-depth level. I aim to move into a product manager role eventually.

What surprised or challenged you when you first joined the tech sector?

I was quite surprised to see how fragmented the industry was. I used to think about tech companies being the big ones such as Google or HP, for example, but most industries have a tech component or are tech-enabled. The tech sector is quite big and continues to grow every year.

What has been your most important lesson to date?

Don’t stop learning! The world is ever-changing and new innovations and technologies keep popping up daily. We can only adapt to this through continuous learning.

How do you think your particular role will change in the next ten years?

The account manager role will be more data-driven and relatively automated, but the human aspect will remain. The typical account manager will, therefore, handle more accounts and use data to optimise client experiences.

The crafter of culture

Eimear Marrinan discusses her journey from Chartered Accountant to Director of Culture at HubSpot.

Why did you choose a career in the tech sector?

I joined the technology sector over seven years ago when it was still growing in Dublin. The ability to be part of a high-growth company and industry was so exciting to me. The pace of change, the opportunity to make an impact, and the chance to work somewhere that challenged me to grow both personally and professionally were also huge draws.

Describe your typical day.

I don’t really have a typical day but in general, I get up with the kids and try to work-out before breakfast (something that has been my saving grace during lockdown!) We’re lucky to have a childminder who comes to our house in the morning, so I have time to check my emails and touch base with my EMEA and JAPAC teams. Since the kids are now at home, I always have lunch with them. Then, the afternoon is generally spent on video calls with my team in NAM and working through my to-do list for the week.

What do you most enjoy about your role?

At HubSpot, our mission is to help millions of organisations grow better. And as Director of Culture, my team is responsible for bringing this mission to life by inspiring and enabling people to do their best work. This gives me so much joy, knowing that we are making a positive impact on our people first and foremost while helping HubSpot achieve its mission and goals.

What surprised or challenged you when you first joined the tech sector?

Moving from a company that was headquartered out of Dublin to one that was headquartered out of the US was a definite challenge. It took time for me to effectively structure my day (and calendar), knowing I spent my morning with APAC and my afternoon on calls with the US. On the flip side, the global reach of the tech sector is incredible – being able to pick up my laptop and walk into a video conference where peers join me from India, France and the US is truly amazing.

What has been your most important lesson to date?

Learn how to focus on fewer things done better. There is so much scope to make an impact and get involved when you join the tech sector, and this can get pretty overwhelming. It is essential to focus on the things that will genuinely make an impact, and nail those before you widen your scope. Also, focus on the things that will scale as the tech sector continues to grow.

How do you think your particular role will change in the next ten years?

We take culture at HubSpot incredibly seriously, so much so that we have published our own external Culture Code. And at this moment in time, as companies lean more heavily into the world of remote, culture is more important than ever. Organisations will recognise that having someone dedicated to creating an inclusive and diverse culture is not just critical for employee engagement and retention; it is business-critical and mission-critical. As we consider changes to how we work in a more virtual world, my role is already shifting towards creating a culture that transcends physical space and is inclusive of everyone – no matter how, when or where they work.