You may think that, as a Chartered Accountant, you should be strong, resilient, and able to solve problems. This is not necessarily true.  You are just as vulnerable as anyone else to the tsunami of apprehension that may be coming at you from all points of your personal compass – from clients, employer, business partners, spouse, elderly family members, children, friends and colleagues.  There are now so many uncertainties about health, finance, fitness, home, diet, sleep and relationships to cope with. You may be strong and grounded and able to cope and you may be able to offer support to others at this moment in time.  Or you may be struggling. You may have a friend, a client, a relative or a colleague who tells you that s/he is considering suicide.   Or you may be so unable to cope yourself that you are considering self-harm, suicide.  Let us consider first who might consider suicide. Who might consider suicide?   Any of us, including you, might think of suicide as a means of dealing with an overwhelming situation.  Generally, suicide is considered when there is a significant imbalance between our risk factors and our protective factors. We all vary, and the list of risk factors is extensive, but your risk factors might include any combination of: A recent bereavement Bullying Serious financial problems A history of depression, schizophrenia, bi-polar disorder, depression, or drug abuse A family history of suicidal behaviour or mental disorders A traumatic event Diagnosis with a possibly terminal illness or condition Relationship breakdown Isolation A personality disorder  Your protective factors might include: Your Relationships Social integration Good network Religious beliefs and practices Access to support agencies Your Personal resilience If you are thinking of suicide?   Take such thoughts very seriously. Do not dismiss them or think that you will come through it. Consider and confront your personal risk factors and notice, name and nourish your protective factors. Focus on your feelings and talk to someone about your feelings. You may be feeling overwhelmed, traumatised, fearful, guilty, unable to cope or powerless. You should name these feelings and the fact that you are thinking of suicide. Notice the impact on your life and name it to yourself and talk to someone about that impact. This might include loss of sleep, drinking, feeling depressed, loss of energy, loss of libido, short temper. Think about who you would like to talk to. It might be a family member, a colleague, CA Support, a counsellor, your GP, a clergyperson, The Samaritans. You should not attempt to deal with these feelings alone.   CA Support has a confidential listening service. Feel free to get in touch if you need support during this time. We can be contacted by email at casuppport@charteredaccountants.ie or call us on (353) 86 024 3294. Article written for CA Support by Prof. Patricia Barker, Dip. Couns., MPhil, PhD, FCA

Apr 09, 2020

Chartered Accountants Ireland  Chartered Accountants Ireland has updated the Technical and business updates page on our COVID-19 Hub with updates on Auditing implications of Coronavirus, Financial Reporting implications of Coronavirus and Information for insolvency practitioners.  We have also updated our page on Key Stakeholder Updates for both ROI and NI / UK in response to COVID-19. Ireland The Central Bank have issued their Quarterly Bulletin which discusses the impact of Covid-19. IAASA has issued a Consultation Paper on its proposals to revise the Ethical Standard for Auditors (Ireland), International Standards on Auditing (Ireland) and Glossary of Terms. Ireland and UK The FRC is seeking to appoint two Non-Executive Members to its UK GAAP Technical Advisory Group (UK GAAP TAG). One member shall be from the Republic of Ireland. UK GAAP TAG considers and advises the FRC Executive and the Corporate Reporting Council on the maintenance and improvement of UK accounting standards. The FRC Executive also looks to the UK GAAP TAG for advice on current, emerging and potential risks to the quality of accounting and financial reporting in the UK and Republic of Ireland as they arise. Find out more in the advert, which is available here. Europe   The European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) has published the 24th Extract from its database of enforcement decisions taken by EU accounting enforcers. ESMA has this week published its report “Enforcement and regulatory activities of European enforcers in 2019” which sets out the enforcement and regulatory activities undertaken in 2019 by European Union (EU) accounting enforcers. Accountancy Europe have this week issued their April Audit Policy Update. A report has been issued this week which provides an overview of the ac­tiv­i­ties of ESMA and the accounting enforcers in the EU when examining com­pli­ance of financial in­for­ma­tion provided by issuers listed on regulated markets with the ap­plic­a­ble financial reporting framework in 2019. International IFAC have this week published its response to Accountancy Europe’s consultation, Interconnected Standard Setting for Corporate Reporting, which addresses the evolution of standard setting to enhance corporate reporting at the global level. The International Auditing and Assurance Standards Board (IAASB) have released International Standard on Related Services (ISRS) 4400 (Revised), its revised standard for performing agreed-upon procedures engagements. In March 2020, the Trustees of the IFRS Foun­da­tion invited ap­pli­ca­tions for can­di­dates to fill four vacancies on the IFRS In­ter­pre­ta­tions Committee. The deadline for ap­pli­ca­tions has now been extended to 8 May 2020.      

Apr 09, 2020
Public Policy

  In this week’s bulletin, read about the €1 billion package of business supports for SMEs announced yesterday by the Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation Heather Humphreys. Additionally, take a look at the European Commission’s latest resources in their effort to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and read about the ESRI’s research into the likely impact of the Government’s income-support measures.   Minister Humphreys announces €1bn package of supports for COVID-19 impacted SMEs Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation Heather Humphreys has announced further measures to help businesses adversely impacted by the COVID-19 restrictions.  Among the measures is an additional €450m expansion of two loan schemes operated by the Strategic Banking Corporation of Ireland (SBCI), bringing the total allocation to support liquidity in companies affected by the COVID-19 crisis to €650m. The Working Capital Loan Scheme, which provides liquidity support to businesses, will receive a further €250m, bringing the total fund to €450m.  The Future Growth Loan Scheme, also operated by the SBCI, will receive an additional €200m that will be released in tranches to provide longer-term loans to firms that have been impacted by COVID-19.  The package is now worth €1 billion in liquidity measures including a new €180m Sustaining Enterprise Fund for firms in the manufacturing and international services sectors. Free mentoring and online training is also available for all SMEs. You can read more about additional business supports available on the Department’s dedicated page.   European Commission mobilises resources to fight the COVID-19 pandemic The European Commission has set out plans for a robust and targeted EU response to support member and partner countries' efforts in tackling the COVID-19 pandemic. The EU's collective action will focus on addressing the immediate health crisis and resulting humanitarian needs, strengthening partner countries' health, water and sanitation systems and their research and preparedness capacities to deal with the pandemic, as well as mitigating the socioeconomic impact. We’ve collated a list of their latest initiatives: Coronavirus Response Investment Initiative – Factsheet and PDF Support to mitigate Unemployment Risks in an Emergency (SURE) Initiative – Factsheet and PDF European Commission and European Investment Fund unlock €8 billion in finance for 100,000 small and medium-sized businesses Global EU response to the coronavirus pandemic ESRI Research: Policy response significantly supports incomes from COVID-19 job losses In a recent paper published yesterday by the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), the think tank analyses the potential costs and distributional effect of COVID-19 related unemployment in Ireland. The research suggests that the measures announced by Government will significantly cushion incomes from COVID-19 related job losses. It finds that the flat-rate Pandemic Unemployment Payment (PUP) of €350 per week does most to support incomes, reducing the number who lose more than 20 per cent of their disposable income by around a third. According to the ESRI: “The Government’s policy response will significantly reduce the number of families who see extreme reductions in their income as a result of job losses related to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. However, the rise in unemployment will bring significant costs to the exchequer: around €800 million per quarter for every 100,000 individuals who lose their job.” The research also finds that the additional cost of the Government’s Temporary Wage Subsidy Scheme may be minimal, in part because its current design is less generous to lower earners than the Pandemic Unemployment Payment they would receive if laid off by their employer. Read the full publication on ESRI’s website. You can also view all updates on our Public Policy web centre.

Apr 08, 2020
Tax UK

  This week, in Irish stories, read about the treatment of additional payments, referred to as ‘top-up-payments made by employers to their employees under the Temporary COVID-19 Wage Subsidy Scheme. In UK stories, we set out the latest information on the advice and supports for businesses and employers impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. While in International news, the European Commission has waived VAT and customs duties on vital medical equipment.      Ireland Take a look at our dedicated COVID-19 Wage Subsidy Scheme page We have confirmed with Revenue that late filing of iXBRL statements due from companies with accounting periods ending on or after June 2019 will not be subject to a late filing surcharge. Read more   UK Read our latest update on the supports for businesses and employers impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic Happy New Tax Year? Or is it….see what has changed in 2020/21 International Read the European Commission update and the guidance on their move to waive VAT and customs duties on vital medical equipment    

Apr 08, 2020
Governance, Risk and Legal

In March, Níall Fitzgerald, spoke with the CEO of Carmichael, Diarmaid Ó Corrbuí, about creating an ethical culture in charities and non-profit organisations. The discussion, now available as a Carmichael Podcast, included highlighting the various important roles Chartered Accountants play in the non-profit sector as employees, trustees, volunteers, auditors, accounting and professional advisors, and donors. The conversation explored several issues including: What is ethics and how organisations in the charity/non-profit sector can ensure they have an ethical culture. The role of the board and the senior management team in defining the core values of the organisation and ensuring they are demonstrated in everyday behaviour. Challenges in relation to speaking up, whistleblowing and identifying who you can turn to when you want to raise a concern. Reporting on organisational culture and demonstrating integrity in the annual report. How an organisation might assess the need for change in its culture and a process for implementing that change. The podcast refers to Chartered Accountants Ireland’s free publications Concise Guide of Ethics & Governance for the Charity and Not-for-profit Sector and Concise Guide for Directors: A Five-step Approach to Considering Organisational Culture, available to download from our governance resource centre at www.charteredaccountants.ie/governance. The Carmichael Podcast is available to listen to here.

Apr 08, 2020

Connecting with family and friends while staying apart We are social beings and seek to connect with those we can identify with whether that is our family, a sports club, college friends or a team at work. In times of celebration we reach out to those connections to share the moment and in times of anxiety or stress we reach out to those within our circle and perhaps seek to support them Now social isolation and slowing the pandemic is crucial, but this isolation can have a negative impact. Psychologists advise that with the increased stress levels, disruption to our normal routine, fears over job losses and reduced social interaction this could lead people towards depression. What can we do? Staying connected while physically apart is challenging, but not impossible. Thankfully, technology will enable us to connect and there are many options available e.g. Skype, Zoom, Whats App are just some of the tools available. We can adapt and for most of us, we have the time to invest in making these connections. Quick tools and guides for video calls There are lots of options and simple guides available online, so use them. Have a virtual coffee or drink with friends, host a virtual party or perhaps for those who are competitive have a virtual quiz. Be creative, have some fun and connect with friends and family and reap the benefits. Setting up a Zoom video call Setting up a Skype video call Setting up a Facetime video call Try and ensure kindness and compassion are foremost in your mind and reach out to connect to family and friends far and wide. We are all in this together and this will pass. A phone call or video call is better than a text. Think about what you will say, you may be stressed, but they could be too, so be prepared to listen. The person on the other end could be vulnerable or perhaps you could the first person they have spoken to today! Top tips for connecting effectively  Think about who you normally connect with and expand it. We tend to stick with our one group and identify with only them, we are all guilty of this strait. This is a global pandemic that affects us all. Be flexible, adapt and push those connections outside your comfort zone and brighten somebody's day by contacting them and checking in on them. By being kind and helping others in need we help ourselves. Is there a vulnerable neighbour who would appreciate some assistance (obviously within the social isolation guidelines)? Working from home can be more challenging for some and if perhaps you know a colleague who might be struggling, could you help with a call/ guidance.   Breath. Yes, we are in an uncertain world, anxiety and stress is constant, and we can feel overwhelmed. Breathing is essential to all us, but just for a few moments concentrate only on that task. This can be enough to reset the mind and start over.  It is useful to be aware of how social isolation may impact us. We have a great capacity to care and show empathy and staying connected with others will lower the impact of the current situation and support our mental wellbeing. Stay safe and stay connected to each other  CA Support has a confidential listening service. Feel free to get in touch if you need support during this time. We can be contacted by email or call us on (353) 86 024 3294.

Apr 08, 2020
Tax

Now available: a dedicated page on the COVID-19 Temporary Wage Subsidy Scheme This page is a summary of advice for members on the COVID-19 Wage Subsidy Scheme. Updated daily, it is providing the Institute's advice on the scheme under the following headings: Employer eligibility Publication of employers Treatment of employer top-up payments Revenue reconciliation Dealing with Revenue  Clarifications from Revenue  For more information see also Revenue’s guidance and Revenue’s FAQs, which are being updated regularly.  

Apr 07, 2020
Careers Development

As a Chartered Accountant dealing with redundancy in the current climate it’s worth noting that redundancy can mean opportunity! Being made redundant can turn your world upside down. It is one of life’s challenges that Chartered Accountants may experience at some point during their working careers. This change in what forms a major part of your life can be dramatic. It represents a time of major disruption but also of new beginnings and opportunities. As we move through this temporary crisis redundancies are unfortunately becoming more common and few sectors are immune. Redundancy is often short lived however and you can take advantage of the situation.   The view you should adopt during this challenging time is as follows: • It is your role that is being made redundant and NOT you. Try not to take it personally. The impact of global events has created this circumstance and nothing else.  • Look to the future and do not dwell on the past. Postmortems will get you nowhere. • Treat it as an opportunity to move out of your comfort zone and to take on a new challenge and to potentially pivot your career.  Considering your options Take time to come to terms with and assimilate your new situation. Make sure you are aware of your entitlements under any redundancy agreement or government supports in the current situation. This may have a major influence on your options and plans going forward. In some instances, the company may offer an executive outplacement service as part of your severance package. This can prove beneficial and provide you with additional support when you are re-entering the job market. If this is not offered, you may wish to investigate if your employer will consider paying towards such a service. You can then source a professional directly.  Looking to the future Once you are over the initial shock of being told that you are to be made redundant, look to the future and see the potential for new opportunities and personal growth.  The time that you now have available can be put to good use. Start by performing an analysis and assessment of your current skills and experience. Where are your strengths and what areas need updating or retraining? Look to the market to see what skills and experience are in demand. There are some sectors that have not been hit as hard as the others. You can then plan any retraining or education based on this. Attend relevant CPD courses to update your skills and knowledge base. Many webinars and on-line courses are currently being offered free of charge including by Chartered Accountants Ireland.  Consider what it is you liked about your job and what you did not enjoy. What is it that motivates you? Going forward you can incorporate these considerations into your new career choices. Cross reference your soft skills to see if there is transferability to the more buoyant sectors in the market. The Career Pathway competency map on the Chartered Accountants Ireland website can help you to identify your skills and to map out your future skills requirements. New beginnings This may in fact have been the push you needed to move out of a stagnant comfort zone giving you the required stimulus you need to make a change. Very often when you are busy you don’t take time to plan or to look at new options. It is easy to become immersed in the mundane day to day aspects of your role and forget to look at the ‘bigger picture’ and think strategically about yourself.   Use this opportunity to re-evaluate the various facets of your life such as your career, life-long learning and development, your aspirations and your finances and earning requirements and potential. Incorporate your thoughts and desires into an overall career plan mapping out your aspirations and how you intend to get there. This will give you a focus and overall aim. You can amend and adjust the plan as required. You should have a number of options that you are considering and do not rely too heavily on anyone. Have a Plan A, Plan B and even a Plan C in place to help keep your options open. Plan for a number of eventualities. Perhaps put a time frame on your new project to give it extra focus e.g. Plan A achieved by August, if not then Plan B by end September and then Plan C completed by November if needed.  Complete change  You may decide to make a complete change and pivot your career such as considering the option of working part time or from home or you may even decide that a short term contract or maternity cover is the clever option for you given the temporary nature of the current market slump. Indeed, you may want to investigate setting up your own business or consultancy.  Spend time researching the various ideas and options open to you. Do not rush into any major decisions. Seek advice from others who may have gone down these routes already or other relevant professionals or contacts. Take advantage of any support and guidance that is on offer. Speak to your mentors and anyone who understands your situation and who can provide meaningful advice.   Interim Solutions Maximise your chances of securing a role by considering contract roles as an interim option. This can very often open up new opportunities for you. Roles that have started as contract can in many cases become permanent. The experience you gain can also serve to enhance your CV and ultimately make you more marketable. Taking a contract role also demonstrates to prospective employers that you are keen to work and are capable of adapting quickly to new work scenarios and environments. It will also help you to avoid any potential long gaps on your CV. Being immediately available is advantageous for contract roles and this can work in your favour. Your CV The main tool you have at your disposal to market yourself is your CV. It’s your sales document. Ensure that it is a fair and accurate reflection of your experience and skills. Ensure that it does you justice and highlights the key skills, knowledge and experience that you can bring to a role. Tailor your CV to each role that you are applying for and you will need a number of versions that emphasise different strengths and areas of expertise. It is the first introduction that a prospective employer will have to you, so it needs to make an impact. Seek advice and support when you are writing your CV. As a member you can avail of free advice in relation to your CV and interview preparation. Sourcing a new role Ensure you are using all your routes to market when you are seeking a new opportunity. In general, they are as follows • Select Recruiters • Advertised opportunities / Jobs Boards • Personal Contacts  • Active Networking / LinkedIn Connectivity • Speculative applications The internet is an invaluable source of information including market and company information. Use it! Create a shortlist of targeted organisations you want to work for and start researching them and their people on LinkedIn and their corporate website.  Reconnecting with ex-colleagues and your former training colleagues can help you to develop your network and help you to learn about any current opportunities that might be available in the market at present. In many cases jobs are not advertised so you will have to network to hear about these roles. This is especially true of more senior level roles. Don’t let your pride get in the way. Let as many people as possible know that you are available and seeking a new challenge.  The more people that are aware of your status the better as this will increase your chances of sourcing a new role. Monitor and track your applications. A spreadsheet often works best for this and you can then follow up on applications you have made and ensure you receive a response. A proactive approach is required. Don’t apply for roles that you are not suited to as this may damage your credibility with the employer. It will also give you more time to apply for roles that you are most suited to, increasing your chances of success. Interviews  When interviews start to result from your applications be prepared to make the most of these opportunities. Preparation is key in advance of any interview and in the current environment being ready for a virtual interview via Skype or Zoom is essential. (see our website for further advice on this topic) Some tips include: • Research the company and the sector • Know your CV • Know the job specification • Be able to articulate synergies between your experience and that required for the role • Ask relevant and pertinent question • Express an interest in the company and the role • Don’t be negative about your redundancy – present a positive outlook If you have not been in an interview scenario for some time it is advisable to avail of a role play service where possible. This will assist you in identifying areas where you can improve on your interview technique and help you to secure that all important job.  Members can avail of a free interview advice offered by the careers team. Salary considerations and negotiations When considering your salary expectations be sure to research the market as the salaries on offer are likely to have changed. When considering an offer do not judge it purely on the base salary. You should consider the company, the role and the opportunities attached to it in terms of career development. Consider also the overall financial value of the package when you attach a figure to pension, health insurance etc. Do not just view the base salary in isolation.  Also, if you are offered a role at a lower salary than you were on prior to redundancy it may be worth serious consideration if it offers genuine career potential and advancements or incentives in the shape of performance related bonuses. Your new start Before starting a new role, if possible, take some quality time to unwind and relax from the stress of redundancy and job searching.  It is always a good idea to allow yourself time to close the chapter of one part of your life, to recharge the batteries before you start on the next phase of your career. The power of positive thinking A positive approach throughout the process will help you to succeed. Dealing with redundancy will provide you with challenges. It will test your resilience and will prove character building. However, with a positive attitude and a determination to succeed it can be the beginning of a new and rewarding chapter of your career, bringing many new experiences and rewards. You will have earned the right to feel proud of your achievements and progress. Your experience will add to your overall confidence and self-esteem levels making you better equipped to deal with life’s obstacles going forward. You never know where it might lead you!! The Chartered Accountants Ireland Careers team can also help you with the following services • Career planning • CV preparation advice • Support with interview preparation • Advice in relation to personal branding and your LinkedIn profile • Market intelligence  • Salary information • Connecting you with our clients who are currently recruiting for Chartered Accountants Ireland Contact the careers service now Dave Riordan Phone 01 637 7251 Karin Lanigan Phone 01 637 7331

Apr 07, 2020
Tax

Or is it? As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, today is the first day of the new tax year 2020-21. This heralds a number of significant changes which we remind you of below. It should be noted, however, that HMRC have decided to defer both the IR35 private sector off-payroll working rules and the end of the soft-landing period for MTD for VAT from April 2020 to April 2021. HMRC have also published updated guidance and help sheets in respect of the new tax year. The following other changes take effect as set out below:- From 1 April 2020, the rate of corporation tax will stay at 19 per cent and will not fall to 17 per cent; From 11 March 2020, the lifetime limit for entrepreneurs’ relief, which will now be known as business asset disposal relief, falls to £1 million with various anti-forestalling measures also applicable; the rate of the R&D expenditure credit increases to 13 per cent for expenditure on or after 1 April 2020; the structures and buildings allowances increases to 3 per cent from 2 per cent from 1 April for companies and 6 April for sole traders/partnerships; From 6 April 2020, the final period exemption for private lettings relief falls to nine months and lettings relief is also reformed; From 6 April 2020, corporate capital losses carried forward will only be able to offset up to 50 per cent of chargeable gains using carried-forward capital losses. Various other changes that are required to deliver or support this the National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage rates for all age bands and for apprentices have increased; rates and thresholds for employers 2020-21 has been published; From 6 April 2020, if you’re a UK resident and sell a residential property in the UK you’ll have 30 days to tell HMRC and pay any Capital Gains Tax owed; HMRC are stopping automatically sending paper Self-Assessment returns; From 1 April 2020, the digital services tax comes into operation; From 6 April 2020, corporate non-resident landlords are subject to UK corporation tax on profits from their UK property rental business instead of 20 per cent basic rate tax – see the guidance on this change; and From 6 April 2020, termination payments in excess of £30,000 will become liable to Class 1A NICs at 13.8 per cent and employers will have in-year reporting and payment responsibilities. The second reading of the latest Finance Bill is currently due to be considered by MPs on Wednesday 22 April 2020. Parts of the Bill will then be considered in Committee of the Whole House on Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 April 2020. The update from HMRC in respect of the off-payroll working rules reads as follows:- “The Government has announced it is delaying the reforms to the off-payroll working rules (IR35) from 6 April 2020 to 6 April 2021. This deferral has been announced in response to the ongoing spread of Covid-19, to help businesses and individuals deal with the economic impacts of the pandemic. This is a deferral of the introduction of the reforms, not a cancellation.   The Government remains committed to introducing this policy to ensure that people working like employees, but through their own limited company, pay broadly the same tax as individuals who are employed directly. The policy will be introduced on 6 April 2021, representing a 12-month delay. Due to this delay HM Revenue and Customs will be pausing the customer support and education programme that HMRC has been delivering to help customers get ready. HMRC will resume education and support activities at the appropriate time ahead of the reform in April 2021. This deferral means that the current off-payroll working rules in the public sector, introduced in 2017 will continue to operate as they do now. Public authorities will not need to implement the changes on status determination statements or implement status disagreement processes until April 2021. Customers can refer to existing guidance on the current rules for public authorities for more information: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/off-payroll-working-in-the-public-sector-reform-of-intermediaries-legislation. HMRC developed a wide range of guidance and support to help customers prepare for the changes, which are now delayed. These products will be updated shortly and remain available to access to help you prepare for the changes due in April 2021. This means that the different rules that exist for inside and outside the public sector will continue to apply until 6 April 2021. This announcement is a deferral of the introduction of the reforms, not a cancellation. The Government remains committed to introducing this policy to ensure that people working like employees, but through their own limited company, pay broadly the same tax as individuals who are employed directly. This means that the different rules that exist for inside and outside the public sector will continue to apply until 6 April 2021.”

Apr 06, 2020
Tax

The European Commission has published VAT guidelines on the EU VAT changes in respect of call-off stock arrangements, chain transactions and the exemption for intra-Community supplies of goods.  

Apr 06, 2020
Tax

The OECD Forum on Tax Administration (FTA) has published a global reference document setting out the actions that FTA tax administrations are currently taking to support taxpayers. These include measures to address cash-flow concerns, difficulties in meeting reporting and payment deadlines and communication initiatives.  

Apr 06, 2020
Tax International

As a result of the restrictions in place due to COVID-19 many cross-border workers are unable to physically perform their duties in their country of employment. This unusual situation is raising many tax issues including issues on the right to tax income between countries which is currently governed by international tax treaty rules. The OECD Secretariat has issued guidance on these issues along with other related cross-border matters. Revenue has also published guidance on the Irish tax position.   The OECD guidance deals with examples where an individual may be stranded for a period in a country that is not his country of residence due to the travel restrictions and quarantine measures.   The guidance also deals with issues affecting the residence of companies for tax purposes where their management is carried out in another country due to the travel and quarantine restrictions.  Read the OECD guidance.  

Apr 06, 2020

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