Updates

Brexit

  Given the latest COVID-19 developments, the EU and UK called off their second round of negotiations last week, originally scheduled to take place in London from 18-20 March 2020, leaving future Brexit talks uncertain. With Chief EU negotiator, Michel Barnier testing positive for COVID-19, his negotiation team and UK counterpart, David Frost are now under self-isolation. The revelation that the two main players in the Brexit talks are out of action raises further questions over whether a deal can be struck before the current deadline of 31 December 2020. The UK is currently in a transition period until the end of the year, with the hopes of negotiating a new partnership with the EU.   Read further updates on our Brexit web centre.

Mar 27, 2020
Brexit

Given the latest COVID-19 developments, the EU and UK called off their second round of negotiations last week, originally scheduled to take place in London from 18-20 March 2020, leaving future Brexit talks uncertain. With the Chief EU negotiator, Michel Barnier testing positive for COVID-19, his negotiation team and UK counterpart, David Frost are now under self-isolation. The revelation that the two main players in the Brexit talks are out of action raises further questions over whether a deal can be struck before the current deadline of 31 December 2020. The UK is currently in a transition period until the end of the year, with the hopes of negotiating a new partnership with the EU.

Mar 23, 2020
Brexit

Following the launch of their respective negotiation mandates, the first round of negotiations between the EU and the UK took place from 2-5 March 2020 in Brussels, Belgium. Given the latest COVID-19 developments, the EU and UK have jointly decided not to hold the second round of negotiations in its original form, which were scheduled to take place in London from 18-20 March 2020. The first round of negotiations between the EU and UK took place from 2-5 March in Brussels. In addition to the opening and closing sessions, and a series of bilateral meetings between the Chief Negotiators of both sides, specific negotiating sessions were held on the following topics: Trade in goods Trade in services Investment and other issues Level playing field for open and fair competition Transport Energy and civil nuclear cooperation Fisheries Mobility and social security coordination Law enforcement and judicial cooperation in criminal matters Thematic cooperation Participation in European Union programmes Horizontal arrangements and governance   In his closing remarks as Chief Negotiator for the European Commission, Michel Barnier described the common challenges faced by the EU and the UK in collaborating as two separate entities: to agree, together, on ground rules that make it possible for us to cooperate: to trade and to travel; and to agree, together, to maintain coherent and comparable high standards over time, that protect our citizens, our consumers, our workers, and our planet.   The second round of negotiations between the EU and UK was scheduled to take place from 18-20 March 2020. Given the latest COVID-19 developments, EU and UK negotiators have jointly decided not to hold this week's round of negotiations in London, in the form originally scheduled. Both sides are currently exploring alternative ways to continue discussions, including, if possible, the use of video conferences. You can find a guide to the ongoing negotiations on the European Commission’s dedicated website.    

Mar 13, 2020
Brexit

  The EU has formally adopted the draft recommendations on negotiating its future relationship with the UK. The approved directives fully respect existing European Council guidelines and conclusions, as well as the Political Declaration agreed between the EU and the UK in 2019, covering areas such as state aid, competition, state-owned enterprises, social and employment standards, environmental standards, climate change, relevant tax matters and other regulatory measures and practices. EU ministers give official green light to Brexit negotiations Earlier this week, the European Union’s (EU) General Affairs Council formally adopted a decision to authorise the opening of the future partnership negotiations between the EU and the UK. The associated negotiating directives are based on the draft recommendation put forward by the Commission on 3 February 2020. The approved directives fully respect existing European Council guidelines and conclusions, as well as the Political Declaration agreed between the EU and the UK in October 2019. The directives cover areas of state aid, competition, state-owned enterprises, social and employment standards, environmental standards, climate change, relevant tax matters and other regulatory measures and practices. Formal negotiations are set to start next week on 2 March 2020. The UK has also published its counterpart of the negotiating directives yesterday, titled “The Future Relationship with the EU: The UK’s Approach to Negotiations”, following the statement by Michael Gove, Minister for the Cabinet Office, in the House of Commons about the UK Government’s negotiating mandate for post-Brexit trade talks with the EU. Mr Gove also stressed upon the UK’s decision to end the transition period on 31 December 2020 by stating that "we (the UK) want the best possible trading relationship with the EU, but in pursuit of a deal we will not trade away our sovereignty."   European Commission published FAQs on Brexit talks The European Commission has released a set of FAQs for the public on the practical aspects of the future EU-UK partnership’s negotiating directives. The Commission’s aim is to maintain full transparency, and some frequently asked questions, are paraphrased below. Have you agreed with the United Kingdom yet about practical arrangements for the negotiations? Practical issues will be agreed jointly between the EU and UK negotiators. Can you really negotiate everything by the end of the year? The Commission intends to achieve as much as possible during the transition period. We are ready to work 24/7 to make the best out of the negotiations. It is possible to extend the transition period by 1 to 2 years. This decision must be taken jointly by the EU and the UK before 1 July. Extending the transition period: if no decision is taken by July 2020, surely there is an alternative mechanism, if needs be? If no decision has been taken by the Joint Committee before July 2020, there is no other legal basis for extending the transition beyond 2020. Is there still a risk of a “no-deal” scenario at the end of the year? As in every negotiation, the risk of not reaching an agreement is there. Regardless of whether a future partnership will be in place, all businesses need to prepare now for the end of the transition period, as the UK will no longer be in the Single Market or the Customs Union.   Read more FAQs on the European Commission’s dedicated webpage.

Feb 28, 2020
Brexit

Part 15 of the Withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union (Consequential Provisions) Act 2019 (the “Brexit Act”) came into force on 31 January by S.I No. 28/2020.  Part 15 of the Act provides that a reference in an enactment to a Member State shall continue to include a reference to the United Kingdom, in so far as is necessary to give effect to the terms of a withdrawal agreement. The meaning of “an enactment” is taken from the Interpretation Act 2005.   The withdrawal agreement refers to the agreement concluded under Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union between the United Kingdom and the EU setting out the arrangements for the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from membership of the European Union.    Notice of this commencement order was made in Iris Oifigiúil.  

Feb 10, 2020
Brexit

It is the end of the first week of the UK-EU transition period. With the EU having launched their draft negotiating blueprint for the trade talks between UK and the EU, read this week’s bulletin for a timeline of developments so far.   EU publishes draft document to open negotiations between UK and EU – 3 February 2020 European Commission has published the comprehensive draft negotiating blueprint for a new partnership between UK and the EU. The draft is now due to be studied by the EU27 member states, with Council of the EU expected to formally adopt the mandate on 25 February 2020, authorising the opening of negotiations on the future UK-EU relationship.   Brexit day: UK officially leaves EU on 31 January 2020  – what’s next? The European Parliament gave its final approval of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement on Wednesday by 621 votes in favour, 49 against and 13 abstentions. On Thursday, the European Council took the final vote enabling the Withdrawal Agreement to enter into force - the last step in finalising the UK’s exit from the bloc. “The Withdrawal Agreement will enter into force upon the UK’s exit from the EU, on 31 January 2020 at 11pm….From that time on, the UK will no longer be an EU member state and will be considered as a third country….The Council has adopted, by written procedure, the decision on the conclusion of the Withdrawal Agreement on behalf of the EU,” said the European Council in conclusion.   What’s next? The UK will now be entering into a transition period with the EU until 31 December 2020, during which they will be negotiating a free-trade agreement aiming for frictionless trade going forward. While they cease to be an EU member state during the transition period, the following stay the same: 1. Travel UK nationals will still be treated the same as EU nationals during the transition. Flights, boats and trains will operate as usual. The Common Travel Agreement between Ireland and UK is retained as well. When it comes to passport control, during the transition period, UK nationals will still be allowed to queue in the areas reserved for EU arrivals only. 2. Pensions UK nationals living in the EU will continue to receive their state pension and will also receive the annual increase. 3. EU Budget contributions The UK will continue to pay into the EU budget during the transition. 4. Trade UK-EU trade will continue without any extra charges or checks being introduced.   Brexit Bill receives royal assent and becomes law – 23 January 2020 The Brexit bill received royal assent yesterday and is now officially an act of parliament - the EU (Withdrawal Agreement) Act. The bill has completed its passage through the UK Parliament and has been signed into law by the Queen. The UK's exit from the EU has also received formal endorsement from the presidents of the European Commission and the European Council and is now expected to move to the European Parliament for ratification on 29 January. UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson is also anticipated to sign the instrument of ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement in the next few days.   British MPs give final backing to Brexit deal, talks to restore power sharing at Stormont continue – 9 January 2020 British MPs have given their final backing to the Brexit bill last night, securing the UK’s exit from the European Union on 31 January 2020. This approval comes following three years of debate over the outcome of the UK’s decision to exit the European Union. The House of Commons voted 330 to 231 in favour of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill, which will now move on to the House of Lords to be passed as legislation next week. Additionally, Tánaiste Simon Coveney and Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Julian Smith have published the text of a deal to restore devolved government in Northern Ireland. Read the press release and full text.   UK Prime Minister’s Brexit bill wins approval in parliament – 20 December 2019 British MPs voted by a majority of 358 to 234 to pass the second reading of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Brexit legislation, as the revised Withdrawal Agreement Bill was brought before the House of Commons. The Brexit bill now also includes a new clause to "legally prohibit" any further extension beyond the end of December 2020. The bill is now due for approval in the House of Commons later this week on Thursday 9 January, giving it just over three weeks to then pass through the House of Lords and receive Royal Assent to meet the Brexit deadline of 31 January 2020.   Conservatives win in UK elections, Brexit deal back on table – 13 December 2019 The Conservative Party, led by Boris Johnson, won an overwhelming majority in the UK general elections. With the Conservatives now having secured the 326 seats required for a majority in the House of Commons, Boris Johnson is back on track for a 31 January 2020 Brexit deadline. Read all our updates in our Brexit web centre.  

Feb 06, 2020
Brexit

It is Week 1 of the UK-EU transition period. The UK has officially ceased to be an EU member state and is ready to begin their negotiations with the EU in areas such as trade, tax, state aid, labour and environmental rights. Read this week’s bulletin for a timeline of developments so far.   Brexit day: UK officially leaves EU on 31 January 2020  – what’s next? The European Parliament gave its final approval of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement on Wednesday by 621 votes in favour, 49 against and 13 abstentions. On Thursday, the European Council took the final vote enabling the Withdrawal Agreement to enter into force - the last step in finalising the UK’s exit from the bloc.  “The Withdrawal Agreement will enter into force upon the UK’s exit from the EU, on 31 January 2020 at 11pm….From that time on, the UK will no longer be an EU member state and will be considered as a third country….The Council has adopted, by written procedure, the decision on the conclusion of the Withdrawal Agreement on behalf of the EU,” said the European Council in conclusion.   What’s next? The UK will now be entering into a transition period with the EU until 31 December 2020, during which they will be negotiating a free-trade agreement aiming for frictionless trade going forward. While they cease to be an EU member state during the transition period, the following stay the same:    1. Travel UK nationals will still be treated the same as EU nationals during the transition. Flights, boats and trains will operate as usual. The Common Travel Agreement between Ireland and UK is retained as well. When it comes to passport control, during the transition period, UK nationals will still be allowed to queue in the areas reserved for EU arrivals only.   2. Pensions UK nationals living in the EU will continue to receive their state pension and will also receive the annual increase.   3. EU Budget contributions The UK will continue to pay into the EU budget during the transition.     4. Trade UK-EU trade will continue without any extra charges or checks being introduced.    Read all our updates in our Brexit web centre.

Feb 03, 2020
Brexit

It is 31 January 2020 – Brexit day. With the EU officially ratifying the Withdrawal Agreement, at 11pm (GMT) the UK officially ceases to be an EU member state. Read this week’s bulletin for a timeline of developments so far.   Brexit day: UK officially leaves EU at 11pm (GMT) tonight – what’s next? The European Parliament gave its final approval of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement on Wednesday by 621 votes in favour, 49 against and 13 abstentions. On Thursday, the European Council took the final vote enabling the Withdrawal Agreement to enter into force - the last step in finalising the UK’s exit from the bloc. “The Withdrawal Agreement will enter into force upon the UK’s exit from the EU, on 31 January 2020 at 11pm….From that time on, the UK will no longer be an EU member state and will be considered as a third country….The Council has adopted, by written procedure, the decision on the conclusion of the Withdrawal Agreement on behalf of the EU,” said the European Council in conclusion.   What’s next? The UK will now be entering into a transition period with the EU until 31 December 2020, during which they will be negotiating a free-trade agreement aiming for frictionless trade going forward. While they cease to be an EU member state during the transition period, the following stay the same: 1. Travel UK nationals will still be treated the same as EU nationals during the transition. Flights, boats and trains will operate as usual. The Common Travel Agreement between Ireland and UK is retained as well. When it comes to passport control, during the transition period, UK nationals will still be allowed to queue in the areas reserved for EU arrivals only. 2. Pensions UK nationals living in the EU will continue to receive their state pension and will also receive the annual increase. 3. EU Budget contributions The UK will continue to pay into the EU budget during the transition. 4. Trade UK-EU trade will continue without any extra charges or checks being introduced. Brexit Bill receives royal assent and becomes law – 23 January 2020 The Brexit bill received royal assent yesterday and is now officially an act of parliament - the EU (Withdrawal Agreement) Act. The bill has completed its passage through the UK Parliament and has been signed into law by the Queen. The UK's exit from the EU has also received formal endorsement from the presidents of the European Commission and the European Council and is now expected to move to the European Parliament for ratification on 29 January. UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson is also anticipated to sign the instrument of ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement in the next few days.   British MPs give final backing to Brexit deal, talks to restore power sharing at Stormont continue – 9 January 2020 British MPs have given their final backing to the Brexit bill last night, securing the UK’s exit from the European Union on 31 January 2020. This approval comes following three years of debate over the outcome of the UK’s decision to exit the European Union. The House of Commons voted 330 to 231 in favour of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill, which will now move on to the House of Lords to be passed as legislation next week. Additionally, Tánaiste Simon Coveney and Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Julian Smith have published the text of a deal to restore devolved government in Northern Ireland. Read the press release and full text.   UK Prime Minister’s Brexit bill wins approval in parliament – 20 December 2019 British MPs voted by a majority of 358 to 234 to pass the second reading of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Brexit legislation, as the revised Withdrawal Agreement Bill was brought before the House of Commons. The Brexit bill now also includes a new clause to "legally prohibit" any further extension beyond the end of December 2020. The bill is now due for approval in the House of Commons later this week on Thursday 9 January, giving it just over three weeks to then pass through the House of Lords and receive Royal Assent to meet the Brexit deadline of 31 January 2020.   Conservatives win in UK elections, Brexit deal back on table – 13 December 2019 The Conservative Party, led by Boris Johnson, won an overwhelming majority in the UK general elections. With the Conservatives now having secured the 326 seats required for a majority in the House of Commons, Boris Johnson is back on track for a 31 January 2020 Brexit deadline.   Read all our updates on our Brexit web centre.  

Jan 30, 2020
Brexit

There are just four days to go until 31 January 2020 – the final Brexit deadline. The UK has passed the legislation to make the current Brexit deal with the European Union official UK law, paving the way for the country’s exit from the EU on 31 January. Read this week’s bulletin for a timeline of developments so far, and the Institute’s guidance on how to best prepare for Brexit.   Brexit Bill receives royal assent and becomes law – 23 January 2020   The Brexit bill received royal assent yesterday and is now officially an act of parliament - the EU (Withdrawal Agreement) Act. The bill has completed its passage through the UK Parliament and has been signed into law by the Queen. The UK's exit from the EU has also received formal endorsement from the presidents of the European Commission and the European Council and is now expected to move to the European Parliament for ratification on 29 January. UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson is also anticipated to sign the instrument of ratification of the Withdrawal Agreement in the next few days.   British MPs give final backing to Brexit deal, talks to restore power sharing at Stormont continue – 9 January 2020   British MPs have given their final backing to the Brexit bill last night, securing the UK’s exit from the European Union on 31 January 2020. This approval comes following three years of debate over the outcome of the UK’s decision to exit the European Union. The House of Commons voted 330 to 231 in favour of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill, which will now move on to the House of Lords to be passed as legislation next week.   Additionally, Tánaiste Simon Coveney and Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Julian Smith have published the text of a deal to restore devolved government in Northern Ireland. Read the press release and full text.   UK Prime Minister’s Brexit bill wins approval in parliament – 20 December 2019   British MPs voted by a majority of 358 to 234 to pass the second reading of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Brexit legislation, as the revised Withdrawal Agreement Bill was brought before the House of Commons. The Brexit bill now also includes a new clause to "legally prohibit" any further extension beyond the end of December 2020.   The bill is now due for approval in the House of Commons later this week on Thursday 9 January, giving it just over three weeks to then pass through the House of Lords and receive Royal Assent to meet the Brexit deadline of 31 January 2020.     Conservatives win in UK elections, Brexit deal back on table – 13 December 2019   The Conservative Party, led by Boris Johnson, won an overwhelming majority in the UK general elections. With the Conservatives now having secured the 326 seats required for a majority in the House of Commons, Boris Johnson is back on track for a 31 January 2020 Brexit deadline.     Institute Brexit guidance   At the time of writing, there are just three weeks to go until 31 January 2020 – the Brexit deadline. With British MPs giving the Brexit deal their final backing, readers are reminded of all available resources to prepare for Brexit.   Brexit infographics   Take a look at our Brexit infographics explaining VAT and customs for businesses under the revised Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill.     Top five Brexit tips   Review our handy graphic on the top five steps you can take to prepare for Brexit.     Guidance video: Single Administrative Document   Watch Chartered Accountants Ireland’s short video to help guide you through filling out the Single Administrative Document, a requirement for making customs declarations post-Brexit by both Irish/UK traders to trade with the UK/EU respectively. Visit our Customs page to watch the video.     Irish Government Brexit resources   The Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation have released several Brexit preparedness supports, including the Brexit preparedness checklist, the Brexit Loan Scheme and the Getting Business Brexit Ready guide. For the full range of supports for businesses, visit the Department’s website.     Read all our updates in our Brexit web centre and our page dedicated to no-deal Brexit planning.

Jan 23, 2020
Brexit

There are just three weeks to go until 31 January 2020 – the final Brexit deadline. With British MPs voting to approve the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill, the UK is now set to leave the European Union on 31 January with an exit deal. Read this week’s bulletin for a timeline of developments so far, and the Institute’s guidance on how to best prepare for Brexit.   British MPs give final backing to Brexit deal, talks to restore power sharing at Stormont continue – 9 January 2020 British MPs have given their final backing to the Brexit bill last night, securing the UK’s exit from the European Union on 31 January 2020. This approval comes following three years of debate over the outcome of the UK’s decision to exit the European Union. The House of Commons voted 330 to 231 in favour of the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill, which will now move on to the House of Lords to be passed as legislation next week. Additionally, Tánaiste Simon Coveney and Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Julian Smith have published the text of a deal to restore devolved government in Northern Ireland. Read the press release and full text.   UK Prime Minister’s Brexit bill wins approval in parliament – 20 December 2019 British MPs voted by a majority of 358 to 234 to pass the second reading of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Brexit legislation, as the revised Withdrawal Agreement Bill was brought before the House of Commons. The Brexit bill now also includes a new clause to "legally prohibit" any further extension beyond the end of December 2020. The bill is now due for approval in the House of Commons later this week on Thursday 9 January, giving it just over three weeks to then pass through the House of Lords and receive Royal Assent to meet the Brexit deadline of 31 January 2020.   Conservatives win in UK elections, Brexit deal back on table – 13 December 2019 The Conservative Party, led by Boris Johnson, won an overwhelming majority in the UK general elections. With the Conservatives now having secured the 326 seats required for a majority in the House of Commons, Boris Johnson is back on track for a 31 January 2020 Brexit deadline.   Institute Brexit guidance At the time of writing, there are just three weeks to go until 31 January 2020 – the Brexit deadline. With British MPs giving the Brexit deal their final backing, readers are reminded of all available resources to prepare for Brexit.   Brexit infographics Take a look at our Brexit infographics explaining VAT and customs for businesses under the revised Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill.   Top five Brexit tips Review our handy graphic on the top five steps you can take to prepare for Brexit.   Guidance video: Single Administrative Document Watch Chartered Accountants Ireland’s short video to help guide you through filling out the Single Administrative Document, a requirement for making customs declarations post-Brexit by both Irish/UK traders to trade with the UK/EU respectively. Visit our Customs page to watch the video.   Irish Government Brexit resources The Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation have released several Brexit preparedness supports, including the Brexit preparedness checklist, the Brexit Loan Scheme and the Getting Business Brexit Ready guide. For the full range of supports for businesses, visit the Department’s website.     Read all our updates in our Brexit web centre and our page dedicated to no-deal Brexit planning.  

Jan 10, 2020
Brexit

There are just 25 days to go until 31 January 2020 – the final Brexit deadline. With UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Brexit bill winning approval in the House of Commons last month, the uncertainty over Brexit has now been replaced by the firm deadline of the end of January. Read this week’s bulletin for a timeline of developments so far, and the Institute’s guidance on how to best prepare for Brexit.   UK Prime Minister’s Brexit bill wins approval in parliament – 20 December 2019   British MPs voted by a majority of 358 to 234 to pass the second reading of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Brexit legislation, as the revised Withdrawal Agreement Bill was brought before the House of Commons. The Brexit bill now also includes a new clause to "legally prohibit" any further extension beyond the end of December 2020.   The bill is now due for approval in the House of Commons later this week on Thursday 9 January, giving it just over three weeks to then pass through the House of Lords and receive Royal Assent to meet the Brexit deadline of 31 January 2020.     Conservatives win in UK elections, Brexit deal back on table – 13 December 2019   The Conservative Party, led by Boris Johnson, won an overwhelming majority in the UK general elections. With the Conservatives now having secured the 326 seats required for a majority in the House of Commons, Boris Johnson is back on track for a 31 January 2020 Brexit deadline.     Institute Brexit guidance   At the time of writing, there are just 25 days to go until 31 January 2020 – the final Brexit deadline. Readers are reminded of the key commercial elements of the Brexit deal and the best resources to prepare for Brexit, regardless of the outcome.   Brexit infographics   Take a look at our Brexit infographics explaining VAT and customs for businesses under the revised Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill.     Top five Brexit tips   Review our handy graphic on the top five steps you can take to prepare for Brexit.     Guidance video: Single Administrative Document   Watch Chartered Accountants Ireland’s short video to help guide you through filling out the Single Administrative Document, a requirement for making customs declarations post-Brexit by both Irish/UK traders to trade with the UK/EU respectively. Visit our Customs page to watch the video.     Irish Government Brexit resources   The Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation have released several Brexit preparedness supports, including the Brexit preparedness checklist, the Brexit Loan Scheme and the Getting Business Brexit Ready guide. For the full range of supports for businesses, visit the Department’s website.     Read all our updates in our Brexit web centre and our page dedicated to no-deal Brexit planning.

Jan 06, 2020
Brexit

With a Conservative win in the UK general elections, the Brexit deal is back on the table. Read this week’s bulletin for a refresher on the key commercial elements of the previously secured Brexit deal and the best resources to prepare for Brexit, regardless of the outcome. UK election results pave way for Conservative majority: Brexit deal back on table The Conservative Party, led by Boris Johnson, has won an overwhelming majority in the UK general elections yesterday. With the Conservatives now having secured the 326 seats required for a majority in the House of Commons, Boris Johnson is back on track for a 31 January 2020 Brexit deadline. With the Brexit deal back on the table, readers are reminded of the key commercial elements of the previously secured Brexit deal and the best resources to prepare for Brexit, regardless of the outcome. Brexit infographics Take a look at our Brexit infographics explaining VAT and customs for businesses under the revised Brexit Withdrawal Agreement Bill. Top 5 Brexit tips  Review our handy graphic on the top five steps you can take to prepare for Brexit. Guidance video: Single Administrative Document Watch Chartered Accountants Ireland’s short video to help guide you through filling out the Single Administrative Document, a requirement for making customs declarations post-Brexit by both Irish/UK traders to trade with the UK/EU respectively. Visit our Customs page to watch the video. Irish Government Brexit resources The Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation have released several Brexit preparedness supports, including the Brexit preparedness checklist, the Brexit Loan Scheme and the Getting Business Brexit Ready guide. For the full range of supports for businesses, visit the Department’s website. Read all our updates in our Brexit web centre and our page dedicated to no-deal Brexit planning.  

Dec 13, 2019